Fertility Jewelry With Healing Stones

Fertility Jewelry With Healing Stones
Fertility Jewelry With Healing Stones

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

USING DONOR EGGS OVER 40, SOME EGG DONORS HAVE REGRETS

Donor Eggs Over 40

Let me say up front that I personally know a number of women (and their children) who have used donor eggs to get pregnant.  However, I also know a couple of women who were told they needed donor eggs but wound up getting pregnant on their own - even over the age of 40.  One woman was taking a break to save up enough money for the procedure when she spontaneously conceived.

My site: www.getpregnantover40.com for more about donor eggs and IVF over 40


 I realize this is a viable option (and perhaps the only option) depending on your diagnosis. However, sometimes I wonder if the women who decide to undergo the rigors of donating their eggs really understand what the consequences are (some even claim that their future fertility was compromised). This article talks about a survey that was done with women who donated their eggs and their physical and emotional state afterwards. Read more:


From the article:

The study, from the University of Washington, examined 80 women from 20 states who had donated eggs from two to 15 years earlier. Participants, whose average age was 30, completed a detailed questionnaire. The researchers found that 16% of women complained of subsequent physical symptoms and 20% reported lasting psychological effects after donation. The physical complaints included bloating, pain, cramping, ovarian hyperstimulation, mood changes, weight gain or weight loss. Several women claimed the process damaged their ovaries, leading to a decrease or loss of fertility.

Psychological repercussions were feelings of attachment to the eggs or to the potential or resulting offspring, concern that a resulting child may want to have a relationship with them and stress resulting from the process. Some complained of being treated callously by clinic staff.

Egg donors are often college students, and they are paid an average of almost $4,000 for their services. The study showed that women who said they were motivated to donate for the money had less satisfying experiences compared with women who said they donated for altruistic reasons. About 19% said their motivations were purely financial and 32% said they just wanted to help others. The remainder of the women said both factors motivated them to donate.

"We were asking these women years later and a feeling of helping may last longer than money," said the study's lead author, psychologist Nancy Kenney, in a news release. "We know if clinics don't offer money, most women won't donate. Great Britain, where there is no paid egg donation program, for example, has a tremendous shortage of donors. But, as one of our donors said, 'If you do this just for money, you'll be sorry.' "

The study also found that a large number of women were not aware of the possible physical risks related to donation. Twenty percent said they did not recall being made aware of the physical risks at the time of their first donation. Young women, in particular, may not fully comprehend the risks, Kenney says. "Risks don't mean much to young women . . . If you are 25 and are told that something may cause cancer when you are 45 that may seem to be forever." More of the women reported being aware of the potential psychological risks.

The study seems particularly relevant during the current economic downturn, as more women might be considering egg donation as a way to make money. One Los Angeles infertility clinic employee I spoke with recently said the number of women enlisting as egg donors has quadrupled in recent months.

from:  

  (www.latimes.com)

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