affiliates



toconceive, key to conceive

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Are Sperm Counts Decreasing?

Fertility and Sperm Counts affected By Environmental Chemicals

I tend to focus on women's infertility on my website and blog, however, sperm counts seem to be decreasing in the general population.
My site: www.getpregnantover40.com
Here is an alarming article about the decline in men's fertility and some possible reasons:

From the article:
During our everyday life we are continuously exposed to a cocktail of chemicals which can mimic the actions of the female hormone, oestrogen. Recent research has shown that many man made chemicals can act as weak oestrogens (xeno-oestrogens), mimicking in part the actions of our own natural hormones directly and indirectly (1, 2, 5, 14, 20, 30 and 31). These chemicals are present in the plastic lining of food cans, in pesticides, in plastics and in paints. In laboratories many designed chemicals have been shown to have oestrogenic effects.
Oestrogenic hormones exert their many effects by binding to intracellular oestrogen receptors, which consist principally of specialised proteins located within the target cells, they recognise the hormone and allow it to regulate specific oestrogen responsive genes within the cell. Oestrogen receptors allow many hundreds of different chemicals to bind to them. In some cases the chemicals have structures so dissimilar to that of the bodies natural oestradiol that they would never normally be thought of as having hormonal activity. These chemicals are very weak oestrogens (20, 30 and 31), but if given in high enough amounts they can activate oestrogen receptors in much the same way as natural hormones do (they do however bind to oestrogen receptors more weakly than the endogenous hormone). The presence of a phenolic hydroxyl group is a common feature of many oestrogenic compounds (30). For example, hydroxylation of o,p'-DDT leads to an enhancement of oestrogenic activity; nevertheless, the parent compound, o,p'-DDT and its (non-hydroxylated) metabolite, DDE, also exert oestrogenic effects .
It was always thought that there was only one oestrogen receptor, however a second receptor (ERβ) has been identified which binds preferentially to certain environmental and natural oestrogens compared with the original oestrogen receptor (ERα). This new receptor is located in higher amounts in specific tissues in the body, such as the prostate and brain (20). Scientists now believe that this combination of different types of oestrogen receptor and differing tissue distribution may be crucial in determining if a particular part of the body is likely to be affected by natural or environmental oestrogens, for example the testes.
One hypothesis is that these ‘false' oestrogens latch on to these hormone receptor sites in the body, possibly blocking the action of the naturally occurring hormone. Another explanation is that the chemicals may mimic its action, switching on or turning off biochemical pathways, and hanging around in the body far longer than natural oestrogen (1). The result is potentially devastating effects on oestrogen-sensitive tissues in both sexes, particularly in the developing foetus.
During our everyday life we are continuously exposed to a cocktail of chemicals which can mimic the actions of the female hormone, oestrogen. Recent research has shown that many man made chemicals can act as weak oestrogens (xeno-oestrogens), mimicking in part the actions of our own natural hormones directly and indirectly (1, 2, 5, 14, 20, 30 and 31). These chemicals are present in the plastic lining of food cans, in pesticides, in plastics and in paints. In laboratories many designed chemicals have been shown to have oestrogenic effects.
Oestrogenic hormones exert their many effects by binding to intracellular oestrogen receptors, which consist principally of specialised proteins located within the target cells, they recognise the hormone and allow it to regulate specific oestrogen responsive genes within the cell. Oestrogen receptors allow many hundreds of different chemicals to bind to them. In some cases the chemicals have structures so dissimilar to that of the bodies natural oestradiol that they would never normally be thought of as having hormonal activity. These chemicals are very weak oestrogens (20, 30 and 31), but if given in high enough amounts they can activate oestrogen receptors in much the same way as natural hormones do (they do however bind to oestrogen receptors more weakly than the endogenous hormone). The presence of a phenolic hydroxyl group is a common feature of many oestrogenic compounds (30). For example, hydroxylation of o,p'-DDT leads to an enhancement of oestrogenic activity; nevertheless, the parent compound, o,p'-DDT and its (non-hydroxylated) metabolite, DDE, also exert oestrogenic effects .
It was always thought that there was only one oestrogen receptor, however a second receptor (ERβ) has been identified which binds preferentially to certain environmental and natural oestrogens compared with the original oestrogen receptor (ERα). This new receptor is located in higher amounts in specific tissues in the body, such as the prostate and brain (20). Scientists now believe that this combination of different types of oestrogen receptor and differing tissue distribution may be crucial in determining if a particular part of the body is likely to be affected by natural or environmental oestrogens, for example the testes.
One hypothesis is that these ‘false' oestrogens latch on to these hormone receptor sites in the body, possibly blocking the action of the naturally occurring hormone. Another explanation is that the chemicals may mimic its action, switching on or turning off biochemical pathways, and hanging around in the body far longer than natural oestrogen (1). The result is potentially devastating effects on oestrogen-sensitive tissues in both sexes, particularly in the developing foetus.
- See more at: http://www.ispub.com/journal/the-internet-journal-of-urology/volume-2-number-1/the-sperm-count-has-been-decreasing-steadily-for-many-years-in-western-industrialised-countries-is-there-an-endocrine-basis-for-this-decrease.html#sthash.HHyhNti2.49OU5ZW1.dpuf



  Excerpted from:  Shiva Dindyal, MBBS (London) BSc. (Hons) Imperial College School of Medicine London United Kingdom
During our everyday life we are continuously exposed to a cocktail of chemicals which can mimic the actions of the female hormone, oestrogen. Recent research has shown that many man made chemicals can act as weak oestrogens (xeno-oestrogens), mimicking in part the actions of our own natural hormones directly and indirectly (1, 2, 5, 14, 20, 30 and 31). These chemicals are present in the plastic lining of food cans, in pesticides, in plastics and in paints. In laboratories many designed chemicals have been shown to have oestrogenic effects.
Oestrogenic hormones exert their many effects by binding to intracellular oestrogen receptors, which consist principally of specialised proteins located within the target cells, they recognise the hormone and allow it to regulate specific oestrogen responsive genes within the cell. Oestrogen receptors allow many hundreds of different chemicals to bind to them. In some cases the chemicals have structures so dissimilar to that of the bodies natural oestradiol that they would never normally be thought of as having hormonal activity. These chemicals are very weak oestrogens (20, 30 and 31), but if given in high enough amounts they can activate oestrogen receptors in much the same way as natural hormones do (they do however bind to oestrogen receptors more weakly than the endogenous hormone). The presence of a phenolic hydroxyl group is a common feature of many oestrogenic compounds (30). For example, hydroxylation of o,p'-DDT leads to an enhancement of oestrogenic activity; nevertheless, the parent compound, o,p'-DDT and its (non-hydroxylated) metabolite, DDE, also exert oestrogenic effects .
It was always thought that there was only one oestrogen receptor, however a second receptor (ERβ) has been identified which binds preferentially to certain environmental and natural oestrogens compared with the original oestrogen receptor (ERα). This new receptor is located in higher amounts in specific tissues in the body, such as the prostate and brain (20). Scientists now believe that this combination of different types of oestrogen receptor and differing tissue distribution may be crucial in determining if a particular part of the body is likely to be affected by natural or environmental oestrogens, for example the testes.
One hypothesis is that these ‘false' oestrogens latch on to these hormone receptor sites in the body, possibly blocking the action of the naturally occurring hormone. Another explanation is that the chemicals may mimic its action, switching on or turning off biochemical pathways, and hanging around in the body far longer than natural oestrogen (1). The result is potentially devastating effects on oestrogen-sensitive tissues in both sexes, particularly in the developing foetus.
- See more at: http://www.ispub.com/journal/the-internet-journal-of-urology/volume-2-number-1/the-sperm-count-has-been-decreasing-steadily-for-many-years-in-western-industrialised-countries-is-there-an-endocrine-basis-for-this-decrease.html#sthash.HHyhNti2.49OU5ZW1.dpuf
During our everyday life we are continuously exposed to a cocktail of chemicals which can mimic the actions of the female hormone, oestrogen. Recent research has shown that many man made chemicals can act as weak oestrogens (xeno-oestrogens), mimicking in part the actions of our own natural hormones directly and indirectly (1, 2, 5, 14, 20, 30 and 31). These chemicals are present in the plastic lining of food cans, in pesticides, in plastics and in paints. In laboratories many designed chemicals have been shown to have oestrogenic effects.
Oestrogenic hormones exert their many effects by binding to intracellular oestrogen receptors, which consist principally of specialised proteins located within the target cells, they recognise the hormone and allow it to regulate specific oestrogen responsive genes within the cell. Oestrogen receptors allow many hundreds of different chemicals to bind to them. In some cases the chemicals have structures so dissimilar to that of the bodies natural oestradiol that they would never normally be thought of as having hormonal activity. These chemicals are very weak oestrogens (20, 30 and 31), but if given in high enough amounts they can activate oestrogen receptors in much the same way as natural hormones do (they do however bind to oestrogen receptors more weakly than the endogenous hormone). The presence of a phenolic hydroxyl group is a common feature of many oestrogenic compounds (30). For example, hydroxylation of o,p'-DDT leads to an enhancement of oestrogenic activity; nevertheless, the parent compound, o,p'-DDT and its (non-hydroxylated) metabolite, DDE, also exert oestrogenic effects .
It was always thought that there was only one oestrogen receptor, however a second receptor (ERβ) has been identified which binds preferentially to certain environmental and natural oestrogens compared with the original oestrogen receptor (ERα). This new receptor is located in higher amounts in specific tissues in the body, such as the prostate and brain (20). Scientists now believe that this combination of different types of oestrogen receptor and differing tissue distribution may be crucial in determining if a particular part of the body is likely to be affected by natural or environmental oestrogens, for example the testes.
One hypothesis is that these ‘false' oestrogens latch on to these hormone receptor sites in the body, possibly blocking the action of the naturally occurring hormone. Another explanation is that the chemicals may mimic its action, switching on or turning off biochemical pathways, and hanging around in the body far longer than natural oestrogen (1). The result is potentially devastating effects on oestrogen-sensitive tissues in both sexes, particularly in the developing foetus.
- See more at: http://www.ispub.com/journal/the-internet-journal-of-urology/volume-2-number-1/the-sperm-count-has-been-decreasing-steadily-for-many-years-in-western-industrialised-countries-is-there-an-endocrine-basis-for-this-decrease.html#sthash.HHyhNti2.49OU5ZW1.dpuf

You May Also Be Interested in These Topics from my website: