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Friday, May 30, 2008

Fertility After Cancer



None of us ever think we're going to be diagnosed with cancer. When I ran a women's infertility support group, there was a woman who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and had undergone chemotherapy. After her therapy was complete, she still wanted to try to get pregnant. She was in her mid 40's at the time and she actually did conceive at the age of 47 (without fertility treatment), but tragically miscarried. I recall something she said that stuck with me. She said compared to infertility, cancer was a breeze. Here is an article about how cancer treatment might affect your fertility:

Fertility and Cancer Treatment

According to the above article, here are some good questions to ask about your fertility if you should need to undergo chemotherapy:

"What are the short-term and long-term effects of cancer treatment on my (or my child's) fertility?


What is the risk of sterility? What are the estimates from the oncology literature of permanent or temporary compromise of fertility or hormonal status associated with the treatments recommended for my type, stage, and grade of cancer? Are there other treatments that could be considered that do not pose as high a risk but are equally effective?


Is there a proven way to preserve my fertility before, during, or after treatment?


Will my desire to attempt to preserve fertility adversely affect the effectiveness of my cancer treatments?


What are my options for reproduction or building a future family?


How long must I wait following treatment before trying to become pregnant?


Can I become pregnant (female) or impregnate someone (male) while receiving chemotherapy or radiation therapy? What happens if pregnancy results during treatment? Is there a risk of birth defects and/or harm to the fetus and/or mother?


Do I need to obtain a referral to consult a specialist in reproductive endocrinology?


Are there support groups available for people who lose fertility as a result of cancer treatment?"

Thursday, May 29, 2008

Blood Pressure and Fertility Part II

My previous post talked about how high blood pressure may negatively affect fertility. So, what can you do about it? Of course, you should check with you doctor about how serious your condition is and what treatments are available. Having said that, there are many ways to lower your blood pressure naturally. This article gives seven medically proven ways:


Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally
Seven medically proven, drugless ways to thwart this killer

Thursday, May 15, 2008

Your Diet Can Affect Your Fertility


Pregnancy Over 40, Fertility Diet

I hate to dwell on it, but I just keep finding more on the diet and fertility connection.
http://www.getpregnantover40.com
This article draws a connection between endometriosis (a common cause of infertility) and diet:

Diet May Help Fight Infertility In Women

From the article:

daily dose of fruits and vegetables may help ward off one of the leading causes of infertility in women.

A study of 1,000 women found those who included fruits and green vegetables in their diet were less likely to develop endometriosis compared to women who passed on the produce. A diet high in meat actually increased the risk.

Endometriosis is a painful condition that happens when the tissue that lines the womb grows outside the uterus.

Researchers aren't sure how fruits and vegetables may protect against the condition and say more studies are needed to better understand the possible link between diet and endometriosis. They note that there was no connection between the condition and dairy products, coffee, alcohol, whole grain foods and fish.

Endometriosis can cause bleeding, pain, inflammation, adhesions and infertility.


I did have some endometriosis (and fibroids) removed some years before I conceived my daughter. Once I cleaned up my diet, I never had a problem with either one again. I find that interesting because both conditions can easily return even if you've had surgery to correct them. I'm certain that I changed the "chemistry" in my body by eating hormone regulating foods. My "internal environment" is just not consistent with endometriosis or fibroids anymore. I've never had an abnormal GYN exam since.

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